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Traditional or Digital?

Luxtra

Blue Jacket
~ Z ~ said:
I like both in all honesty. Both have their pros and cons. Digital art is a bit easier for me because I can just click 'undo' and it gives me a bit more of an open window. Traditional art is the same but just a bit harder to erase your mistakes. xDD

Pretty much the same for me. All in all I like digital art a bit more because of the "undo" option. I tend to make a lot of mistakes OTL
 

Snowball Cay

Green Jacket
Luxtra said:
~ Z ~ said:
I like both in all honesty. Both have their pros and cons. Digital art is a bit easier for me because I can just click 'undo' and it gives me a bit more of an open window. Traditional art is the same but just a bit harder to erase your mistakes. xDD

Pretty much the same for me. All in all I like digital art a bit more because of the "undo" option. I tend to make a lot of mistakes OTL

I like both too.
 

LoopyPanda

Black Jacket
95% of my complete drawings are digitally done. But that's probably because I like working in layers and don't have to worry about smearing colors. I'm left handed so a lot of the time my sketches lose their lines from my hand smearing the pencil off. Ink helps but if I'm not careful I mess up that too lol.

And every time I make a mistake on paper, I make the motion my hand does for Ctrl Z for undoing it. XD
 

~ Z ~

Black Jacket
I am so used to traditional that I just simply cannot do digital. Well... I CAN but it takes me twice the amount of time mostly because I haven't really been exposed to it or really used to it. I wish I can work with Digital art better, or, at least, as good as my traditional. That way I can save paper! xDD
 

LoopyPanda

Black Jacket
ShineCero said:
Well, in terms of drawing digitally, what kind of drawing tablet do you guys use? How did you get use to not seeing your drawings when using one? xD

I use the Wacom CTE-440. Which compared to oother digital artists, is rather outdated/a very basic tablet. Since it isn't even wireless/battery powered, you have a USB cable to plug in to your laptop.
cte-440s-01.jpg


Mine however is white and doesn't come with a rubber grip, but that's probably because my tablet was a hand-me-down gift from my cousin when she got an upgrade on her drawing tablet.

This one comes with a little plastic cover you can lock into place; when I first got this tablet (8th grade) I was drawing things with Windows XP Paint and Manga Studio Debut. 

At first, it was pretty difficult since the sense of space and keeping your eyes on a screen rather than your hand is leagues different. How I sotuated myself into it was putting small doodles I wanted to lineart under this hard plastic cover and it allowed me to look at my hand while I drew-- the drawback was I had to be careful where I put the drawing and to make sure the cursor was 'pulled' center front (which is easy by flicking the pen to guide your cursor). Outside that square, the cursor stops (not the case when you keep the cover off though). So I essentially restricted the freedom of my hand to force myself to look at the screen. 

SAI is much more flexible than MS and Paint are; since you can just rotate the whole canvas by clicking the button to get that curve or line right. 

To learn to switch between paper and screen art takes time; I used my tablet whenever I got the chance while I used the computer and kept my hand drawings to my notebook doodles. If you consistently use the tablet and start out on simple small drawings, it progressively situates you.
 

Nick

Green Jacket
I like traditional, it tends to look better in my opinion, digital is usually too clean
LoopyPanda said:
95% of my complete drawings are digitally done. But that's probably because I like working in layers and don't have to worry about smearing colors. I'm left handed so a lot of the time my sketches lose their lines from my hand smearing the pencil off. Ink helps but if I'm not careful I mess up that too lol.

And every time I make a mistake on paper, I make the motion my hand does for Ctrl Z for undoing it. XD

Layers are the only way I can make art that is clean, and although I usually don't smear that much, Im still terrible at erasing things and so I just have indented lines all throught my work from terrible erasing skills and too heavy of hands...


ShineCero said:
Well, in terms of drawing digitally, what kind of drawing tablet do you guys use? How did you get use to not seeing your drawings when using one? xD

I have a Wacom Intuos pro medium, It has no screen so it was hard to get used to, and it has a ton of features that I can't use because Im a poor sod and don't have photoshop, so I instead use Paint-dot-net (Getpaint.net).
I also don't have a scanner so none of my had drawn art can really be put up online, besides, its all on lined paper and ugly.

Still terrible at art though...
 

ShineCero

The Strongest
ADMINISTRATOR
LoopyPanda said:
ShineCero said:
Well, in terms of drawing digitally, what kind of drawing tablet do you guys use? How did you get use to not seeing your drawings when using one? xD

I use the Wacom CTE-440. Which compared to oother digital artists, is rather outdated/a very basic tablet. Since it isn't even wireless/battery powered, you have a USB cable to plug in to your laptop.
cte-440s-01.jpg


Mine however is white and doesn't come with a rubber grip, but that's probably because my tablet was a hand-me-down gift from my cousin when she got an upgrade on her drawing tablet.

This one comes with a little plastic cover you can lock into place; when I first got this tablet (8th grade) I was drawing things with Windows XP Paint and Manga Studio Debut. 

At first, it was pretty difficult since the sense of space and keeping your eyes on a screen rather than your hand is leagues different. How I sotuated myself into it was putting small doodles I wanted to lineart under this hard plastic cover and it allowed me to look at my hand while I drew-- the drawback was I had to be careful where I put the drawing and to make sure the cursor was 'pulled' center front (which is easy by flicking the pen to guide your cursor). Outside that square, the cursor stops (not the case when you keep the cover off though). So I essentially restricted the freedom of my hand to force myself to look at the screen. 

SAI is much more flexible than MS and Paint are; since you can just rotate the whole canvas by clicking the button to get that curve or line right. 

To learn to switch between paper and screen art takes time; I used my tablet whenever I got the chance while I used the computer and kept my hand drawings to my notebook doodles. If you consistently use the tablet and start out on simple small drawings, it progressively situates you.

Yeah. I tried out my drawing tablet when I brought Clip Studio Paint. It's wonderful, better than their original MStudios, but for some reason, I just can't get the hang of not looking what I'm doing. Granted, my laptop is super duper slow... so that that's another factor.

I should probably invested on a drawing tablet with a screen in the near future.




Apparently, I'm getting a drawing tablet with a screen soon, so... I have a question. How long does it take to get use to drawing digitally? Just curious how long it took you guys to get an handle on digital art :thinking:
 

~ Z ~

Black Jacket
ShineCero said:
LoopyPanda said:
ShineCero said:
Well, in terms of drawing digitally, what kind of drawing tablet do you guys use? How did you get use to not seeing your drawings when using one? xD

I use the Wacom CTE-440. Which compared to oother digital artists, is rather outdated/a very basic tablet. Since it isn't even wireless/battery powered, you have a USB cable to plug in to your laptop.
cte-440s-01.jpg


Mine however is white and doesn't come with a rubber grip, but that's probably because my tablet was a hand-me-down gift from my cousin when she got an upgrade on her drawing tablet.

This one comes with a little plastic cover you can lock into place; when I first got this tablet (8th grade) I was drawing things with Windows XP Paint and Manga Studio Debut. 

At first, it was pretty difficult since the sense of space and keeping your eyes on a screen rather than your hand is leagues different. How I sotuated myself into it was putting small doodles I wanted to lineart under this hard plastic cover and it allowed me to look at my hand while I drew-- the drawback was I had to be careful where I put the drawing and to make sure the cursor was 'pulled' center front (which is easy by flicking the pen to guide your cursor). Outside that square, the cursor stops (not the case when you keep the cover off though). So I essentially restricted the freedom of my hand to force myself to look at the screen. 

SAI is much more flexible than MS and Paint are; since you can just rotate the whole canvas by clicking the button to get that curve or line right. 

To learn to switch between paper and screen art takes time; I used my tablet whenever I got the chance while I used the computer and kept my hand drawings to my notebook doodles. If you consistently use the tablet and start out on simple small drawings, it progressively situates you.

Yeah. I tried out my drawing tablet when I brought Clip Studio Paint. It's wonderful, better than their original MStudios, but for some reason, I just can't get the hang of not looking what I'm doing. Granted, my laptop is super duper slow... so that that's another factor.

I should probably invested on a drawing tablet with a screen in the near future.




Apparently, I'm getting a drawing tablet with a screen soon, so... I have a question. How long does it take to get use to drawing digitally? Just curious how long it took you guys to get an handle on digital art :thinking:



When I got my tablet, I got used to it within a couple of days but that's only because I played with it for a long time. Just practice some sketches and 'not-so-serious' drawings as you begin to get the hang of the new tablet. I also looked up some tutorials online on how to properly use layers and colors. It takes a bit of getting used to but if you mess around with a few settings and not get discouraged over a few 'bad' drawings, you'll get hooked!

Clip Paint Studio also offers an animation tab/creator but I recommend you try the baby steps first before jumping into the Olympic pool. Don't do what I did. xDD
 

LoopyPanda

Black Jacket
For me, I've never really tried to look for any means of drawing with a screen tablet until the new trend of deviating from wacom tablets towards ipads and similar touchpads emerged within the last 2 years. Before I got my tablet, I'd draw terrible weeby anime stuff in MS Paint and a mouse during my middle school years on top of normal drawings so that kind of already helped me get used to looking at a screen as I drew by the time my tablet came into my hands. 

I think it was the gradual transition from drawing at 100% zoom to 300-500% zoom in my workspace was my biggest helper. On top of that, I would scan pictures of stuff I wanted to fully render into a digital drawing and just open it in my art program. Then I'd just open a new layer and draw the lines separately and color that... if I didn't end up editing the original image ofc. That kind of helps, but it's rather time consuming if you attempt to do this without resizing/cropping your scanned image (which can be done in-program)

Starting out picking 'small' canvases to do simple pieces was more comfortable for me, while I'd save BIG canvases for "sketchdump" time where I'd try to fill in most of the space with whatever crap I wanted. I didn't post it most of the time but it's a nice practice to get used to how zooming in vs zooming out works on different sized canvases. 

Consistent time spent on is the biggest factor though. I think it's mostly just getting your brain to change how it coordinates motor cooperation between the eyes and the arm. You're basically teaching your brain to process visual stimuli independent of watching how your hand is moving, and trying to get it to stop focusing on the "invisible hand" aspect.
 
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